Valley Charter Elementary » UPK Planning

UPK Planning

VCS logoValley Charter Elementary School UPK Plan

Transitional Kindergarten Implementation Timeline

As a condition of receipt of apportionment, school districts and charter schools must implement universally available TK for all four-year-old children by 2025–26 (EC 48000[c][1]). LEAs are encouraged to consider how this implementation timeline will impact elements of their UPK Plan, including whether implementing UTK on a fast timeline will allow the LEA to reach economies of scale with regard to the number of classrooms and TK teachers needed. The table below illustrates the UTK implementation timeline, including eligibility and ratios.

Table: TK Eligibility, Ratio, and Class Size Requirements by Fiscal Year

Type of Requirement

2021–22

2022–23

2023–24

2024–25

2025–26

Eligibility

Turn five between

September 2 and

December 2; at district discretion, turn five between December 3 and the end of the school year

Turn five between

September 2 and

February 2; at district discretion, turn five between February 3 and the end of the school year

Turn five between

September 2 and April 2; at district discretion, turn five between April 3 and the end of the school year

Turn five between

September 2 and June 2; at district discretion, turn five between June 3 and the end of the school year

Turn four by

September 1

Ratios

Not specified

1:12

1:10**

1:10**

1:10**

 

Class Size

24

24

24

24

24

* average class size across the school site

** Subject to future legislative appropriation

 

UPK Planning Template

Self-Certification

In the data collection survey submitted to the CDE, LEAs must self-certify they developed a plan that was presented for consideration by the governing board or body at a public meeting on or before June 30, 2022, for how all children in the attendance area of the LEA will have access to full-day learning programs the year before kindergarten that meet the needs of parents, including through partnerships with the LEA’s expanding learning offerings, ASES, CSPP, Head Start programs, and other community-based early learning and care programs.

 

  1. Please complete the following table:

LEA Name

Contact Name and Title of the Individual Self-Certifying the Statement Above

Email

Phone

Valley Charter Elementary School

Carolyn Yaffe, Executive Director

[email protected]

818-810-6713

 

 

  1. Did the LEA develop a joint plan with multiple LEAs (for example, multiple small and rural LEAs serving similar communities or countywide plans developed with support of the COE for all LEAs in the county)? [select one]
    1. Yes
    2. No
  1. If the LEA answered Yes to Question 2, what other LEAs are part of this joint plan? n/a

Projected Enrollment and Needs Assessment

Recommended Planning Questions

The CDE recommends LEAs prioritize these questions as part of their UPK Plan in addition to required questions.

  1. What do existing data sources indicate about parental needs and preferences related to early learning and care programs for three- and four-year-old children in the LEAs attendance area? (LEAs are encouraged to work with local early learning and care partners such as CSPP, Head Start programs, LPCs, R&Rs, and APPs, and utilize data sources such as LPC Needs Assessment data, Head Start Needs Assessments, and so on).

Data from our enrollment processes and inquiries related to TK indicate a desire for TK programming at Valley Charter Elementary School (VCES).

  1. Using the projected TK enrollment for the LEA provided by the CDE, make modifications to the LEA’s TK student estimates and make cumulative facilities and staffing estimates needed each year from school year 202223 to 2025–26. Complete the following tables.

Table: Projected Student Enrollment

Type of Student

2019–20

Current

(TK-eligible children turn five between September 2 and December 2, inclusive)

2022–23

(TK-eligible children turn five between September 2 and February 2, inclusive)

2023–24

(TK-eligible children turn five between September 2 and April 2, inclusive)4

2024–25

(TK-eligible children turn five between September 2 and June 2, inclusive)

2025–26

(TK-eligible children turn four by September 1)

TK Students

n/a

n/a

n/a

40*

40*

40*

CSPP (if applicable)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

*Note that these numbers will change if the teacher;student ratio requirements change based on funding formulas.

Table: Facilities Estimates (Cumulative)

Type of Facility

2019–20

Current

2022–23

2023–24

2024–25

2025–26

TK Classrooms

0

0

0

2

2

2

CSPP Classrooms

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Head Start or Other Early Learning and Care Classrooms

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

Table: Staffing Estimates (Cumulative)

Type of Staff

2019–20

Current

2022–23

2023–24

2024–25

2025–26

TK

n/a

n/a

n/a

2

2

2

TK Teacher’s Assistants

n/a

n/a

n/a

2

2

2

CSPP (if applicable)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Other CSPP Classroom Staff (if applicable)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Early Education District-level staffing (if applicable)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

  1. As part of the ELO-P requirements, EC Section 8281.5 requires LEAs to offer or partner in offering in-person before school or after-school expanded learning opportunities that, when added to daily instructional minutes, are no fewer than nine hours of combined instructional time and expanded learning opportunities per instructional day, including through partnerships with the LEA’s expanding learning offerings, ASES, CSPP, Head Start programs, and other community-based early learning and care programs.

Consider your estimated number of TK students. Estimate the number of TK students that will utilize extended learning and care services in addition to the TK instructional minutes. Then, working with local early learning and care and expanded learning partners, estimate the number of slots available for TK students in the following programs:

 

Table: Projected Number of TK Students Utilizing Extended Learning and Care

201920

Current

202223

202324

202425

202526

n/a

n/a

n/a

Projected number is ~10 students.

Projected number is ~10 students.

Projected number is ~10 students.

 

Table: Projected Number of Slots Available for TK Students

This entire table does not not apply to VCES as do not plan for CSPP, Head Start or ASES program slots.

Slot Type

2019–20

Current

2022–23

2023–24

2024–25

2025–26

CSPP

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Head Start

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

ASES Program/ELO-P

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

Focus Area A: Vision and Coherence

In order to provide equity of access for all students and their families, it is vital for the LEA, in partnership with early learning and care programs, to develop a coherent educational system that begins with UPK, includes access to TK and other options for all four-year-old children, and provides nine hours of programming per day through a combination of instructional time and extended learning and care opportunities for those families who choose this option.

In planning for UPK, consider how the LEA’s administrative structure will support school leadership in building connections between them and expanded learning programs as well as early learning and care programs (CSPP, Head Start, other subsidized or privately administered preschool and child care programs) to provide UPK programing and before school and after-school, intersession, and summer learning and care.

Recommended Planning Questions

The CDE recommends LEAs prioritize these questions as part of their UPK Plan in addition to required questions.

  1. What is the LEA’s vision for UPK?

Valley Charter Elementary School’s (VCES) vision for UPK is that we will welcome two classes of TK students onto our campus beginning in SY 23-24 and that current mission, vision, classroom structures, and curriculum are extended down to our TK students in a developmentally appropriate manner so that there is a clear continuum of philosophy and practice TK-5 at VCES.

  1. In addition to TK, what service delivery models will be integrated to offer UPK programming, including the nine hours of total extended learning and care programming around the TK instructional time for families that opt in? In developing this component of the plan, LEAs should include partners such as CSPP, Head Start, and other early learning and care providers to ensure local services and funding are maximized and coordinated in response to parental needs and choice.

VCES will partner with our current before/after care provider to ensure all requirements of ELOP are met for our  enrolled TK students.

  1. Describe the planned administrative structure that will support and monitor the UPK program and facilitate connections with the ELO-P as well as non-LEA-administered early learning and care programs that will support the extended learning components of UPK.

Given the amount of TK classes/students we will be adding (two) the current administrative structure in place will continue to be utilized to support and monitor the TK and ELOP programming for our 4 year olds, once we are able to welcome them onto campus.

  1. Identify and assign each individual that will be responsible for key functions pertaining to implementing UPK (for example, academic or educational services, early childhood, facilities, human resources and labor, special education, English learner or multilingual programs, partnerships, including early learning and care and ELO-P, assessment and data collection, professional learning, workforce recruitment and preparation support, or others).

Key  functions related to design and implementation of TK will be carried out by the Executive Director (Carolyn Yaffe), Principal (Elizabeth Adams), and Operations Manager (Carolina Merino).

  1. Identify how UPK leadership will be integrated in the decision-making process at the executive or cabinet level.

This does not apply due to the size of our organization and that we will not be adding an additional role for UPK leadership.

  1. Describe how the LEA’s proposed UPK model will be integrated with the district’s LCAP.

Where applicable, goals, metrics, strategies and aligned funding will be outlined  in the LCAP. 

  1. Describe how the LEA plans to ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in UPK classrooms and who will be involved in the process.

Student enrollment is determined through a lottery process; the lottery process determines which students and families are offered spots.

Valley Charter Elementary will ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in UPK classrooms beginning with the lottery process.  All students, regardless of whether or not they have an IEP, are given equal opportunity in the lottery.  Our director of family engagement, administration, and our director of special education are involved in this part of the process by ensuring parents understand our special education program and that the school has received a copy of the student’s IEP. After a student with disabilities is accepted into UPK, they are included in the general education classroom the way our K-5 students are.  They receive special education services in accordance with their IEP and they participate in the general education curriculum. Classroom teachers, administration, and the special education coordinator are involved in this part of the process.

  1. Describe how the LEA plans to support sites in building connections between them and ELO-P, as well as early learning and care partners.

VCES has an established partnership/connection with a before and after care provider; this partnership will be expanded to include TK students once TK is implemented.

Required Questions

CDE will be requiring this information to be completed after the plan is presented to the governing board.

  1. Which of the following model(s) of service delivery does the LEA plan to implement for UPK for all four-year-old children, including classes fully inclusive of children with disabilities, to provide access to the least restrictive environment for learning? [select all that apply]
    1. TK offered at all sites (note: VCES has only one site)
    2. TK offered at some sites
    3. TK stand-alone classes
    4. TK and kindergarten combination classes
    5. CSPP and TK combination classes (CSPP funding and ADA funding)
    6. Locally-funded preschool and TK combination classes
    7. CSPP stand-alone classes
    8. Head Start stand-alone classes
    9. Other [describe, open response]
  2. Does the LEA plan to implement full-day TK, part-day TK, or both? [select one]
    1. Full Day TK
    2. Part Day TK
    3. Both
  3. Describe how the model(s) of service delivery selected in the preceding two questions will be implemented across the LEA’s sites and why.

VCES is a single school and functions as its own LEA. A full day model at this site is planned so that existing families who have children in upper grades can have one pick-up and drop-off for all children in a family, thus removing potential barriers to participation for families where a half-day would be prohibitively challenging to manage.

  1. Does the LEA plan to begin operating a CSPP or expand its current CSPP contract? [select one]
    1. Yes - the LEA applied to expand its existing CSPP contract in 202223
    2. Yes - the LEA applied for a new CSPP contract in 202223
    3. Yes - the LEA will apply to expand its existing CSPP contract in future years (if funding is appropriated by the legislature)
    4. Yes - the LEA plans to apply to administer a CSPP contract in future years (if funding is appropriated by the legislature)
    5. No - the LEA has no plans to begin or expand a CSPP contract in future years
    6. No - the LEA plans to relinquish or reduce CSPP services in future years
  2. If the LEA answered yes in question four, what age of children does the LEA plan to serve through a CSPP contract? [select all that apply]
    1. Three-year-old children
    2. Four-year-old children who will not be enrolled in TK in the current school year
    3. Four-year-old children who will be enrolled in early admittance TK on their fifth birthday but who are not yet enrolled because their birthday does not fall in the range for which LEAs are fully funded to support TK. (Note: children whose birthdays fall outside of this range can be served in TK at LEA option from the beginning of the school year, but LEAs only generate ADA after the child’s fifth birthday.)
    4. Four-year-old children who are enrolled in TK, including early admittance TK (CSPP would provide extended learning and care in addition to the TK instructional day).
  3. Please indicate if the LEA plans to serve students eligible for early admittance TK, for children whose fifth birthday occurs after the enrollment date for the year of implementation (see implementation timeline above)?
    1. 202223 (Birthdays February 3 or after) This is n/a for VCES as we will not have the facilities to welcome TK students until SY 23-24.
      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Maybe
    2. 202324 (Birthdays April 3 or after) [select one]
      1. Yes
      2. No (VCES will only be able to serve students for whom funding is available.)
      3. Maybe
    3. 202425 (Birthdays June 3 or after) [select one]
      1. Yes
      2. No (VCES will only be able to serve students for whom funding is available.)
      3. Maybe

Focus Area B: Community Engagement and Partnerships

To successfully implement UPK and create a P–3 continuum, LEAs will need to cultivate relationships and collaborate with both internal and external partners.

Required Questions

CDE will be requiring this information be completed and submitted to the CDE after the plan is presented to the governing board.

  1. Identify which of the following opportunities the LEA implemented to obtain public input on the UPK Plan. [Select all that apply]
    1. Parent Teacher Association Meetings
    2. Family or parent surveys
    3. English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC)
    4. District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC)
    5. Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA)
    6. School Site Council
    7. District Advisory Committee
    8. LCAP educational partners input sessions
    9. Tribal Community input session
    10. Co-hosting events with community-based organizations (CBOs)
    11. Hosting meet and greets with the early learning and care community
    12. LPC Meetings
    13. Local Quality Counts California (QCC) consortia meetings
    14. First 5 County Commission meetings
    15. Community Advisory Committee (CAC)
    16. Head Start Policy Council meetings
    17. Collaboration with parent engagement centers (for example, Parent Training and Information Center [PTIC], Community Parent Resource Center [CPRC], Family Empowerment Centers [FEC])
    18. Other [describe, open response]
  2. Select which programs the LEA plans to combine with the TK instructional day to offer a minimum of nine hours per day of programming (instructional day plus programming) for children whose families opt in for extended learning and care. [select all that apply]
    1. Expanded learning programs on an LEA site (ASES, 21st Century Community Learning Centers [21st CCLC], ELO-P)
    2. Expanded learning programs at a CBO site (ASES, 21st CCLC, ELO-P)
    3. CSPP (on an LEA site)
    4. CSPP (at a CBO site)
    5. LEA- or locally-funded preschool
    6. Head Start
    7. LEA preschool funded with Title I of the Every Student Succeeds Act funds
    8. Other CBO preschool
    9. State subsidized child care (not including CSPP)
    10. Other [describe, open response]

Focus Area C: Workforce Recruitment and Professional Learning

Based on the projected enrollment and needs described in Focus Area A, LEAs should create a plan to recruit, train, and support the new TK, preschool, early learning and care, and expanded learning staff needed to support full-day early education options for all children the year before kindergarten.

(Note: All LEAs will need to plan for workforce development considerations as part of this planning work. There is a separate $100 million allocation for the Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant – Competitive, also known as the Early Education Teacher Development Grant, that will be competitively awarded and is not part of this planning template.)

EC Section 48000(g)(4) specifies that credentialed teachers who are first assigned to a TK classroom after July 1, 2015, have, by August 1, 2023, one of the following:

  1. At least 24 units in early childhood education, or childhood development, or both.
  2. As determined by the LEA employing the teacher, professional experience in a classroom setting with preschool age children that is comparable to the 24 units of education described in subparagraph (a).
  3. A Child Development Teacher Permit issued by the CTC.

EC Section 8295 specifies that teachers in CSPP shall either possess a permit issued by the CTC authorizing service in the care, development, and instruction of children in a child care and development program; or meet the following criteria:

  1. Possess a current credential issued by the CTC authorizing teaching service in elementary school or a single subject credential in home economics; and
  2. Possess twelve units in early childhood education or child development, or both, or two years’ experience in early childhood education or a child care and development program.

Recommended Planning Questions

The CDE recommends LEAs prioritize these questions as part of their UPK Plan in addition to required questions below.

  1. How does the LEA plan to recruit the educators needed to implement its UPK Plan (including CSPP teachers, assistant teachers, TK teachers, and TK teachers’ instructional aides and assistants)?

VCS plans to recruit the educators needed to implement our UPK plan by continuing to cultivate teaching assistants in credentialing programs and continuing to partner with CSUN professors supervising student teachers to find high quality candidates aligned with our mission and vision.

  1. How does the LEA plan to partner with CSPP, Head Start, and other early learning and care providers to offer joint professional learning opportunities?

VCES plans to design and deliver professional learning for TK classes; this PD will be informed by the California standards and frameworks for preschool, as well as the school’s particular instructional model.

  1. What is the LEA’s planned strategy for providing professional learning for educators across the LEA’s P–3 continuum? Plans might include the following:

VCES has the following structures in place to support all educators, inclusive of those across the P-3 continuum:

  • ~13 in-service days per year dedicated to professional learning
  • Minimum days each Thursday to allow for 2 hours of professional learning per week
  • “Sub-out” days where grade level teams are provided ½ day planning blocks
  • An intentional grade-level team planning structure that provides planning expectations, planning time, and embeds accountability for student outcomes
    1. Who will receive this professional learning?
      1. By role (lead teachers, assistant teachers, administrators, coaches, and so forth)

Classroom teachers and assistant teachers.

      1. By grade (TK staff, kindergarten through third grade staff, on-site preschool staff, off-site preschool staff, and so forth).

TK staff, K-3 staff (and all staff).

    1. What content will professional learning opportunities cover?
      1. Effective adult-child interactions
      2. Children’s literacy and language development (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
      3. Children’s developing math and science (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
      4. Children’s social-emotional development (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
      5. Implicit bias and culturally- and linguistically-responsive practice
      6. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and trauma- and healing-informed practice
      7. Curriculum selection and implementation
      8. viii.Creating developmentally-informed environments
      9. Administration and use of child assessments to inform instruction
      10. Support for multilingual learners, including home language development and strategies for a bilingual classroom
      11. Serving children with disabilities in inclusive settings, including Universal Design for Learning
      12. Engaging culturally- and linguistically-diverse families
    2. How will professional learning be delivered?
      1. Coaching and mentoring
      2. Classroom observations and demonstration lessons with colleagues
      3. Workshops with external professional development providers
      4. Internally-delivered professional learning workshops and trainings
      5. Operating an induction program
      6. Partnerships with local QCC professional learning in CSPP settings
      7. In mixed groupings (for example, TK and CSPP teachers)
  1. How does the LEA plan to facilitate the development of a district early education leadership team (across grade levels and departments) and promote site-based horizontal and vertical articulation (P–3) teams to support student transitions, share strategies, and collaboratively monitor student progress?

Required Questions

CDE will be requiring this information be completed after the plan is presented to the governing board.

  1. Which of the following strategies does the LEA intend to use to support diverse and effective prospective TK teachers, including multilingual educators, to earn a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential? [select all that apply]
    1. Partner with one or more local Institutions of higher education (IHEs) or the COE to help support teachers holding less than a full credential to complete requirements to earn a preliminary Multiple Subject Teaching Credential
    2. Apply for a California Classified School Employee Teacher Credentialing Program grant (https://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/grant-funded-programs/Classified-Sch-Empl-Teacher-Cred-Prog) on your own, with your COE, as part of a new collaborative, or by joining an existing Classified grant program to recruit teachers
    3. Apply for a California Teacher Residency Grant Program (https://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/grant-funded-programs/teacher-residency-grant-program) on your own, as part of a new collaborative, or by joining an existing Teacher Residency Grant Program to recruit and prepare individuals with a bachelor’s degree who want to become teachers in your LEA
    4. Join an existing intern preparation program to recruit and prepare teachers for your LEA
    5. Join an existing apprenticeship cohort program to recruit and prepare teachers for your LEA
    6. Establish a relationship with other local LEAs to establish pathways for high school students interested in a career in CSPP or in P–3 teaching through clubs, registered apprenticeships, or other such early recruitment opportunities
    7. Partner with the California Center on Careers to contact registrants who might be interested in becoming teachers for your LEA
    8. Provide information on scholarship and grant opportunities to CSPP and other staff interested in providing extended learning and care services
    9. Apply for workforce development funding and competitive grant opportunities from the CDE
    10. Provide a stipend for tuition and fees for coursework leading to a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential
    11. Provide advising on credential requirements and options for how to meet these requirements
    12. Collaborate with IHEs to offer unit-bearing coursework at a local LEA site during times that work for teachers and other interested staff members [list IHEs, open response]
    13. Partner with a local IHE to provide other services to candidates seeking to earn a Multiple Subject Teaching Credential
    14. Partner with a COE to provide other services to candidates seeking to earn a multiple subject credential
    15. Other

Valley Charter Elementary has an already established track record of cultivating a pipeline by supporting classified staff (Teaching Assistants) to become credentialed multiple subject teachers for employment at Valley Charter Elementary. 

Valley Charter Elementary also already has an established practice of coordinating with CSUN to identify talented students on the cusp of credentialing to be employed as either Teaching Assistants or classroom teachers (depending on where they are in the trajectory of their program).

    1. None of the above, the LEA currently has enough Multiple Subject Teaching Credential holders to meet the need for TK educators
  1. Which of the following strategies does the LEA intend to employ to support diverse and effective prospective TK teachers, including multilingual educators, to meet the requirements under EC Section 48000(g)(4)? [select all that apply
    1. Partner with a local IHE offering eligible early childhood education or childhood development coursework
    2. Partner with an IHE or COE to operate cohort models for LEA teachers earning 24 units
    3. Provide information on scholarship and grant opportunities
    4. Apply for workforce development funding and grant opportunities
    5. Provide a stipend for tuition, fees, and other programmatic costs associated with obtaining credit-based coursework or a degree
    6. Provide a stipend for tuition, fees, and other programmatic costs associated with obtaining a Child Development Teacher Permit
    7. Provide advising on requirements and how to meet the requirements
    8. Offer unit-bearing IHE coursework at a local LEA site during times that work for teachers
    9. Develop or work with an established mentorship program to support new TK teachers
    10. Other [describe, open response]
    11. None of the above; the LEA currently has enough Multiple Subject Teaching Credential holders who have at least 24 units in early childhood education, or childhood development, or both; professional experience in a classroom setting with preschool-age children that is comparable to the 24 units of education described in subparagraph (a); or a Child Development Teacher Permit issued by the CTC
  2. Which of the following strategies does the LEA intend to employ to support diverse and effective prospective CSPP teachers, including multilingual educators, to obtain a Child Development Teacher Permit.

This does not apply to Valley Charter Elementary school.

    1. Partner with a local IHE offering eligible early childhood education or childhood development coursework
    2. Partner with an IHE or COE to operate cohort models for educators working towards a Child Development Teacher Permit
    3. Provide information on scholarship and grant opportunities
    4. Apply for workforce development funding and grant opportunities
    5. Provide a stipend for tuition, fees, and other programmatic costs associated with obtaining credit-based coursework or a degree
    6. Provide a stipend for tuition, fees, and other programmatic costs associated with obtaining a Child Development Teacher Permit
    7. Provide advising on requirements and planning for how to meet the Child Development Teacher Permit requirements
    8. Offer unit-bearing coursework at a local district site during times that work for teachers
    9. Other
    10. None of the above, the LEA is not planning to support prospective CSPP educators in obtaining a Child Development Teacher Permit
  1. On which child observational assessments does the LEA intend to offer professional learning to TK, CSPP, and other early education teachers during the 202223 school year? [select all that apply]
    1. Ages & Stages Questionnaire (ASQ)
    2. BRIGANCE Early Childhood Screen
    3. Desired Results Developmental Profile (DRDP)
    4. Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA)
    5. LEA-based, grade level benchmarks and a report card
    6. Teaching Strategies GOLD (TS GOLD)
    7. Work Sampling System (WSS)
    8. Other

VCES-specific philosophies and practices such as constructivist learning, project-based learning, “Cool Tools” social-emotional learning framework, reading and writing workshop and Singapore math (as developmentally appropriate for TK).

    1. The LEA does not plan to offer professional learning on child observational assessments
  1. On what topics does the LEA intend to offer professional learning regarding early childhood education to site leaders and principals? [select all that apply]
    1. Effective adult-child interactions
    2. Children’s literacy and language development (aligned with the Preschool Learning Foundations and Frameworks)
    3. Children’s developing math and science (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
    4. Children’s social-emotional development (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
    5. Implicit bias and culturally- and linguistically-responsive practice
    6. ACEs and trauma- and healing-informed practice
    7. Curriculum selection and implementation
    8. Creating developmentally-informed environments
    9. Administration and use of child assessments to inform instruction
    10. Support for multilingual learners, including home language development and strategies for a bilingual classroom
    11. Serving children with disabilities in inclusive settings, including Universal Design for Learning
    12. Engaging culturally- and linguistically-diverse families
    13. Other [describe, open response]
    14. Site leaders and principals will not be offered professional learning on early childhood education

Focus Area D: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

It is critical for each LEA and preschool program partner to plan for how they will develop or select curriculum or curricula that are developmentally-informed and aligned with the strengths of all students, including multilingual students and students with disabilities, as well as how they will ensure curricula are implemented with fidelity to support intentional, quality instruction for all students. LEAs and preschool program partners should consider how they will provide coherent, culturally- and linguistically-responsive UPK curriculum or curricula anchored in the California Preschool Learning Foundations (https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/psfoundations.asp) and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks (https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/psframework.asp) to support the development of skills across the domains outlined in those documents.

Recommended Planning Questions

The CDE recommends LEAs prioritize these questions as part of their UPK Plan in addition to required questions.

  1. Describe how the LEA will develop or select a curriculum for UPK classrooms that aligns with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks.

Valley Charter Elementary School uses a teacher-created, constructivist, project-based learning model. As such, TK teachers at VCES will develop a project-based curriculum that is aligned to the California Preschool Learning Foundations and California Preschool Curriculum frameworks and utilize appropriate elements of reading and writing workshop and Singapore math, which are our chosen curricula in ELA and math.   

  1. Describe the intended timeline for curriculum implementation, including steps for piloting and gathering input from UPK teachers, and a process for ensuring curriculum fidelity.

 

  1. What actions does the LEA plan to take to support effective classroom organization practices and behavior management strategies to ensure a positive learning environment for a diverse population of UPK students?
  2. Describe how classroom practices for UPK (TK and other preschool programs the LEA operates or has on site) will be integrated and aligned.
  3. What instructional practices does the LEA plan to implement to support children with disabilities in UPK (for example, implementing Universal Design for Learning, providing specialized services in the classroom with peer models, implementing social-emotional strategies such as the Pyramid Model)?
  4. What instructional practices does the LEA plan to implement to support the language and overall development of multilingual learners?

VCES utilizes the reading and writing workshop curriculum out of Teachers’ College at Columbia University to support language and literacy development.

  1. How does the LEA plan to assess dual language learners (DLLs) in areas other than English language acquisition? [open response]

Required Questions

CDE will be requiring this information be completed after the plan is presented to the governing board.

  1. Does the LEA plan to provide any of the following language model(s) for TK students? [select all that apply]
    1. Dual language program with a language allotment of 50/50 [open response for language offered]
    2. Dual language program with a language allotment of 90/10 [open response for language offered]
    3. Dual language program with a language allotment of 80/20 [open response for language offered]
    4. Dual language program with a language allotment of 70/30 [open response for language offered]
    5. English-only instruction with home-language support
    6. None
    7. Other [describe, open response]
  2. If the LEA administers CSPP, does it plan to provide any of the following language model(s) for CSPP students? [select all that apply] This is n/a for VCES.
    1. Dual language program with a language allotment of 50/50 [open response for language offered]
    2. Dual language program with a language allotment of 90/10 [open response for language offered]
    3. Dual language program with a language allotment of 80/20 [open response for language offered]
    4. Dual language program with a language allotment of 70/30 [open response for language offered
    5. English-only instruction with home-language support
    6. None
    7. Other [describe, open response]
  3. Identify methods the LEA plans to use to support the development of social-emotional learning and executive function skills through specific instruction in these areas and by embedding and reinforcing this instruction in all curriculum areas. [select all that apply]
    1. Provide training for staff on the Center on the Social Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) Pyramid Model
    2. Implement the CSEFEL Pyramid Model in the classroom
    3. Designing developmentally-appropriate learning environments to allow for individual and group activities that promote social-emotional learning and executive function skills (for example, use students’ pictures or words in daily routines, feelings charts)
    4. Promote learning through play as a context for social and emotional development, including social play with teachers and peers in small or large group settings
    5. Use developmental observations to identify children’s emerging skills and support their development through daily interactions
    6. Development of lesson plans or use of a curriculum that includes specific and targeted social-emotional learning and executive function activities throughout the day of instruction
    7. Staff development opportunities encouraging reflective practice and cross-level support for instruction specific to social-emotional learning and executive function skills
    8. Offer open-ended, self-directed learning opportunities that foster individual interests and curiosity and new learning
  4. What instructional practices does the LEA plan to implement to support children with disabilities in UPK programming? [select all that apply]
    1. Implement Universal Design for Learning
    2. Provide adaptations to instructional materials
    3. Provide specialized services (for example, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech and language pathology therapy) in the classroom with peer models
    4. Implement social-emotional strategies, such as the Pyramid Model, CSEFEL, and others
    5. Provide additional staff to support participation in instruction
    6. Other [open response]
  5. What assessments does the LEA plan to use in TK or kindergarten? [select all that apply]
    1. ASQ
    2. BRIGANCE Early Childhood Screen
    3. DRDP
    4. DRA
    5. LEA-based grade level benchmarks and a report card
    6. TS GOLD
    7. WSS
    8. Other [describe, open response]
    9. The LEA does not plan to use a common TK assessment
    10. Unsure VCES is engaged in research on this and will determine the answer as we move closer to implementation.

Focus Area E: LEA Facilities, Services, and Operations

It is critical to ensure that LEA facilities, services, and operations are thoughtfully aligned to support the implementation of UPK and movement towards a P–3 continuum. It is also critical for early education programs currently operating to continue to be a part of California’s mixed-delivery system by creating shared space, blending funding and coordinating service delivery.

For Facilities:

For facilities planning, draw on the Projected Enrollment and Needs Assessment section of this document and the LEA’s Facilities Master Plan. The objectives of this section are to identify the availability of space for UPK, the adequacy of available space to meet the kindergarten facilities standards for meeting the needs of young children, and, if needed, to update the Facilities Master Plan to address any unmet need for developmentally-appropriate space.

Recommended Planning Questions

The CDE recommends districts prioritize these questions as part of their UPK Plan in addition to required questions.

  1. What strategies does the LEA plan to employ to integrate younger children and older children on the same campus and ensure safety and appropriate commingling?

There is a separate playyard for Kindergarteners that will also be used for TK students. TK students and K students will be scheduled for lunch together, apart from older students.  The campus is currently set up so that younger and older students use separate bathrooms.

  1. Describe how the LEA plans to address transportation issues resulting from UPK implementation.

This does not apply to VCES as we are not required to provide transportation for our students, per our Charter.

  1. What strategies does the LEA intend to implement to ensure TK students have access to meals and adequate time to eat (for example, adding additional meal services and time in the cafeteria, offering breakfast after the bell [students pick up a breakfast and bring it to the classroom])? (Note: The LEA must continue to comply with all health and safety, state, and federal Child Nutrition Program regulations while implementing meal service) [open response]

TK students will be scheduled for lunch at the same time as our kindergarten students.

Required Questions

CDE will be requiring this information be completed after the plan is presented to the governing board.

  1. To support an overall increase in UPK access, what efforts does the LEA plan to make to prevent the displacement of any early education programs on LEA campuses, including both LEA-administered and non-LEA-administered programs? This does not apply to VCES.  We are seeking to add additional space in order to be able to accommodate TK.
  2. Does the LEA have adequate classroom space to meet the Projected Enrollment of TK students listed in the Projected Enrollment and Needs Assessment section of this document, for the respective implementation year? [multiple choice]
    1. Yes

No

    1. If no, how many more classrooms does the LEA need?  We need two classrooms.
      1. If no, how might the LEA provide classrooms in the timeframe needed? We are working with our site landlord (we rent from a private space) to add two classrooms by 23-24.
  1. Does the space meet the kindergarten standards described in California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 14030(h)(2)? This is n/a at this point in time as the space still needs to be built, but it will be compliant with all applicable standards.
    1. Yes

No

    1. If no, what modifications need to be made?  What resources are needed to make them? (See Facilities Grant Program Funding at https://www.dgs.ca.gov/OPSC/Services/Page-Content/Office-of-Public-School-Construction-Services-List-Folder/Access-Full-Day-Kindergarten-Facilities-Grant-Program-Funding) [describe, open response]
  1. Does the space contain necessary adaptive equipment, assistive technology, or other accommodations to ensure children with disabilities have access to education in the least restrictive environment? This is n/a at this point in time as the space still needs to be built but it will be compliant with all applicable codes and standards.
    1. Yes

No

    1. If no, what modifications need to be made? What resources are needed to provide equipment or accommodations? [describe, open response]
  1. Does the LEA’s Facilities Master Plan adequately address the need for UPK programming? Prior to this recent directive from the state, VCES did not have plans to add facilities; given the new requirement, adding classrooms for TK is now part of our strategic plan.
    1. Yes

No

    1. If no, what process will the LEA use to update the Facilities Master Plan to accommodate future TK and early education programming?  [describe, open response]
  1. In which of the following areas does the LEA intend to make updates to facilities? [select all that apply]
    1. Turfed area
    2. Paved area
    3. Apparatus area
    4. Land required for buildings and grounds
    5. Total square feet required
    6. None of the above
  2. What transportation will the LEA offer to children enrolled in TK? [select all that apply]
    1. Transportation to and from the TK program
    2. Transportation from the TK program to an extended learning and care opportunity on another LEA site
    3. Transportation from the TK program to an extended learning and care opportunity on a non-LEA site (for example, a CBO that operates a preschool program)
    4. No transportation will be provided (Transportation is not required per our charter)
  3. Will the LEA offer transportation to transport TK children to extended learning and care opportunities that are at other sites than the one the child is enrolled at for TK? Extended care will be offered at our site.

Technical Assistance Questions

The CDE is collecting information on the type(s) and topics of technical assistance that LEAs need to support implementation of a robust UPK Plan and effective UPK program. This information will be used to leverage existing resources and inform future technical assistance opportunities provided by CDE partners, including COEs, to help ensure that the needs of LEAs are met.

The following questions are optional. However, unlike the recommended questions included in Focus Areas A through E, the CDE will be collecting any information that LEAs wish to provide in response to these questions via the survey that the CDE administers to collect the required data questions above.

  1. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to projecting enrollment and assessing needs? [select all that apply]
    1. Support for parent surveys to gauge interest in service delivery models
    2. Data analysis capacity building to support staff to refine enrollment projections based on community context
    3. Information on program eligibility requirements to project enrollment across programs
  2. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to the elements included in Focus Area A: Vision and Coherence? [select all that apply]
    1. Adjusting classroom practices to support the district’s UPK model (for example, mixed-age classrooms)
    2. Creating inclusive classrooms, including implementing Universal Design for Learning
    3. Templates or framework for drafting a P–3 vision that partners and parents support
    4. Models for administrative structures that support effective UPK programs and facilitate connections with the ELO-P and non-LEA-administered early learning and care programs
    5. Support for developing and applying to administer a CSPP contract
    6. Technical assistance on how to integrate UPK and P–3 in the district LCAP
    7. Guidance on best practices for smooth transitions through the P–3 continuum
    8. Considerations for TK early admittance
  3. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to the elements included in Focus Area B: Community Engagement and Partnerships? [select all that apply]
    1. Support for parent surveys and engagement activities to understand parent needs and support authentic choice
    2. Support for community engagement activities including best practices for coordination with LPCs, Local QCC Consortia, First 5 County Commissions, Head Start Policy Councils and other early learning and care leadership tables
    3. Guidance on best practices for enrolling more children with disabilities in UPK classrooms and providing services in inclusive settings
    4. Strategies for meeting the ELO-P requirements through different models of extended learning and care, including models of blending and layering funding to support the nine-hour day and ensuring developmentally-informed environments for young children
    5. Increasing UPK enrollment and parent awareness of programs
  4. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to the elements included in Focus Area C: Workforce Recruitment and Professional Learning? [select all that apply]
    1. Additional guidance on UPK workforce requirements (TK, CSPP, and other early learning and care providers)
    2. Creating joint professional learning opportunities for preschool and elementary school teachers within LEAs or across LEA- and CBO-administered programs
    3. Strategies to support the teacher pipeline, including, but not limited to, recruiting multilingual educators, cohort models, apprenticeships, or residency programs
    4. Identifying the content, type, and frequency of professional learning opportunities given the needs of the community and the LEA’s P–3 vision
    5. Creating professional learning opportunities to provide site leaders with more early childhood knowledge
    6. Building partnerships with IHEs or COEs to support professional learning opportunities and degree attainment
    7. Support for communications to recruit prospective educators and share grant and scholarship opportunities to support degree attainment
  5. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to support for professional learning opportunities on specific topics? [select all that apply]
    1. Effective adult-child interactions
    2. Children’s literacy and language development (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
    3. Children’s math and science development (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
    4. Children’s social-emotional development (aligned with the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks)
    5. Implicit bias and culturally- and linguistically-responsive practice
    6. Trauma- and healing-informed practice
    7. Curriculum selection and implementation
    8. Creating developmentally-informed environments
    9. Administration and use of child assessments to inform instruction
    10. Support for multilingual learners, including home language development and strategies for a bilingual classroom
    11. Serving children with disabilities in inclusive settings, including Universal Design for Learning
    12. Engaging culturally- and linguistically-diverse families
  6. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to support for specific professional learning delivery mechanisms? [select all that apply]
    1. Coaching and mentoring
    2. Classroom observations and demonstration lessons with colleagues
    3. Workshops with external professional development providers
    4. Internally-delivered professional learning workshops and trainings
    5. Operating an induction program
  7. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to the elements included in Focus Area D: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment [select all that apply]
    1. Guidance on how to adopt the California Preschool Learning Foundations and the California Preschool Curriculum Frameworks into a specific UPK setting (for example, mixed-age classrooms)
    2. Guidance on the selection, development, or integration of developmentally-informed curricula and aligning curricula across the early grades
    3. Guidance and best practices on how to monitor and support curriculum fidelity in UPK settings
    4. Guidance on how to support effective classroom organization practices and behavior management strategies to ensure a positive learning environment for a diverse population of UPK students
    5. Guidance on instructional practices to support children with disabilities in UPK (for example, implementing Universal Design for Learning, providing specialized services in the classroom with peer models, and implementing social-emotional strategies such as the Pyramid Model) and partnerships with early learning and care providers to support services for children with disabilities
    6. Specific instructional strategies to support specific skills including, but not limited to, children’s social-emotional development and home language development
    7. Guidance on appropriate assessment selection and utilization
    8. Guidance on creating dual language immersion or bilingual programs
  8. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to implementing hands-on, interactive, and developmentally-informed early education experiences for UPK students? [select all that apply]
    1. Using manipulatives to develop fine motor skills
    2. Incorporating a balanced approach to teaching and learning that includes both child-initiated and teacher-guided activities
    3. Facilitating the development of critical thinking skills through the inquiry process (for example, the scientific method) to enhance children’s learning experiences
    4. Using differentiated groups that include individual, small, and large group experiences
    5. Considering the structure of the daily routine to enhance individual and group learning experiences
    6. Encouraging purposeful play, choice, social interactions, and collaboration
    7. Creating time and space for children to develop gross motor skills inside the classroom and in the outdoor environment
    8. Using child development knowledge to guide instructional approaches
    9. Providing language- and literacy-rich environments
    10. Intentional planning of developmentally-informed practices and curriculum to meet the individual needs of children in combination classrooms
    11. Facilitating development and exploration through art
    12. Incorporating inclusive practices
    13. Supporting students’ home language and English language development
    14. Incorporating materials and manipulatives that are culturally representative of the children served to support dramatic play that inspires engagement, communication, and understanding of diversity
    15. Universal Design for Learning
    16. Integrated English language development
  9. What technical assistance would be most helpful related to the elements included in Focus Area E: LEA Facilities, Services, and Operations? [select all that apply]
    1. Guidance on how to modify an elementary school classroom to serve young children
    2. Strategies to address transportation issues related to UPK access and enrollment
    3. Guidance to support strategies that ensure TK students have access to meals and adequate time to eat
    4. Making modifications to district data systems to support access to UPK assessment data and other relevant information across community and elementary school settings
    5. Best practices for preventing displacement of early learning education programs operated by non-LEA administrators on LEA campuses and transitioning programs to serve younger children

Appendix I - Definitions

The following definitions are critical for UPK planning efforts. Additional terms and definitions can be found in the Guidance Document:

  • Preschool through Third Grade (P–3): P–3 is a continuum of learning from preschool through third grade that can be supported by intentional practices at the classroom, school, and leadership levels that align curricula, assessment, and professional learning opportunities to ensure instruction builds on the knowledge and skills that children acquire as they transition across grades and settings.
  • Universal prekindergarten (UPK): UPK refers to universal TK as well as the expanded CSPP, Head Start, and early childhood special education services that families can choose from to create rich early learning opportunities for all three- and four-year-old children during the year or two years before kindergarten. In high-needs neighborhoods, the CDE strongly encourages LEAs to consider pairing TK programs with access to Head Start and CSPP for age- and income-eligible three- and four-year-old children to further bolster program quality, either through the LEA’s own Head Start or CSPP program or via a contract partnership with a CBO that administers a Head Start or CSPP.
  • Transitional kindergarten (TK): TK means the first year of a two-year kindergarten program, serving four-year-old children regardless of income that uses a modified kindergarten curriculum that is age- and developmentally-appropriate (EC Section 48000 [d]).
  • Universal transitional kindergarten (UTK): UTK refers to the expansion of TK by 2025–26 to serve all four-year-old children by September 1 of each year, regardless of income, providing a year of rich learning opportunities the year before kindergarten that families can choose from as part of California’s public education system.
  • California State Preschool Program (CSPP): CSPP is the largest state-funded preschool program in the nation. CSPP includes both part-day and full-day services to eligible three- and four-year-old children. CSPP provides a core class curriculum that is developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate for the children served. The program also provides meals and snacks to children, parent education, referrals to health and social services for families, and staff development opportunities to employees. The program is administered through LEAs, colleges, community-action agencies, local government entities, and private, nonprofit agencies.
  • Expanded learning: This includes before school, after-school, summer, or intersession learning programs that focus on developing the academic, social, emotional, and physical needs and interests of pupils through hands-on, engaging learning experiences. It is the intent of the Legislature that expanded learning programs are pupil-centered, results-driven, include community partners, and complement, but do not replicate, learning activities in the regular school day and school year.
  • Expanded Learning Opportunities Program (ELO-P): ELO-P provides funding for after-school and summer school enrichment programs for TK through sixth grade. The ELO-P is defined as services provided in addition to the normal school day and school year operations, to provide full-day and full-year expanded learning programs to meet the needs of working families whose children are enrolled in TK through sixth grade and also provide expanded learning enrichment programming for students. A full day is defined as in-person before school or after-school expanded learning opportunities that, when added to daily instructional minutes, are no fewer than nine hours of combined instructional time and expanded learning opportunities per instructional day. A full year includes a minimum of 30 days of programming in the summer and intersession for no fewer than nine hours of in-person expanded learning opportunities per day.
  • Early learning and care: This refers to the continuum of programs serving children from birth to preschool or school entry, as well as extended care to support school-age children with before school and after-school care as well as vacation schedules. This includes general child care, Early Head Start and Head Start, community-based early learning and care programs, family child care providers, and family, friend, and neighbor care.
  • Extended learning and care: This refers to the continuum of programs and services (early learning and care options and expanded learning options) available in addition to the normal school day and school year operations, to provide full-day and full-year care to meet the needs of working families whose children are enrolled in TK or kindergarten. A full day is defined as in-person before school or after-school programming or care that, when added to daily instructional minutes, provide no fewer than nine hours of combined instructional time and expanded learning opportunities per instructional day. A full year includes a minimum of 30 days of programming in the summer and intersession for no fewer than nine hours of in-person expanded learning opportunities per day. Funding to support extended learning and care for children enrolled in TK includes the ELO-P and the CSPP, as specified in guidance provided by the CDE’s Early Education Division. Additional subsidized care opportunities may be available to families who qualify, such as child care vouchers and the General Child Care School Age program.